JI Design | What Your Logo Says About You
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What Your Logo Says About You

Your logo is the face of your business. It goes everywhere that your business goes, with or without you. So it’s only safe to say that your logo should be a keen and clear representation of your business.

Color palette, typography, and iconography all work hand in hand to create a logo. Colors all inherently evoke emotions and feelings (check out this chart to learn more). A sans-serif typeface can be more contemporary and corporate than a serif typeface, whereas a sans-serif can represent more historical, traditional, or warm characteristics. The icons you choose to represent your company all come with baggage, too. These are just a few reasons why trusting a designer to do the research and understand all of these relations can benefit your company when developing your brand.

Take for example, one of the most famous logos and a Seattle-based company we all know very well, Starbucks. “[The] Starbucks logo and its packaging have a unique design that unfailingly catches the interest and attention of onlookers. This memorable symbol is one of most recognized business logo design that’s adored by coffee lovers from across the globe. In fact, it wouldn’t be an exaggeration to say that the unique concept of Starbucks logo design has contributed immensely in the company’s success worldwide.” [Source: Designhill]

The iconography in the Starbucks logo has mythological references that mirror the goals of the company. The twin-tailed mermaid, or siren, featured in the logo is known to have lured sailors to shipwreck off the coast of an island in the South Pacific (Starbuck Island). Similarly, Starbucks is constantly aiming to lure coffee lovers into their shops.

Over time, the Starbucks logo has evolved in all of these categories. It is now more contemporary and graphic, but with much less detail in the siren. The color palette now heavily relies on green, so as to represent [the] growth, freshness, uniqueness and prosperity of Starbucks. The current logo is much more streamlined than the original. Now that it is so recognizable, the wordmark is no longer included on the outside of the circle.

Here at JI Design, we work mostly with small businesses. Brand recognition and consistency is just as important for small businesses as it is for global coffee empires. When you have a logo that brings together the history, inspiration, and motives of your company, you have a strong and confident brand that consumers can trust in.

Caroline Garriott